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What’s Next in Data Security and Privacy? 6 Trends to Watch in 2020

January 21, 2020

The 2010s saw data emerge as a driving force in the world economy. The vast collection of and use of data revolutionized industries and led to significant advancements in transportation, medicine, software, and advertising. With this explosion of data, however, came nearly daily reports of security and privacy breaches: thefts of customer information, phishing attacks, and local governments and multinational corporations held hostage by ransomware demands. As the decade closed, federal and state governments stepped up efforts to address these risks.

What to expect in 2020? O’Melveny’s Data Security and Privacy Group takes a look at some of the major trends that will define the coming year, including: new state and federal privacy litigation, increasingly sophisticated ransomware attacks, government efforts to protect the technology supply chain, and data issues raised by the growing fintech and artificial intelligence sectors.

   


VIDEOS

The Evolving Threat Landscape

Data Security and Privacy Co-Chair Lisa Monaco discusses the most active cybersecurity threats, their consequences, and how companies can mitigate cybersecurity risks.
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Ransomware
Data Security and Privacy Co-Chair Steve Bunnell discusses which companies are at risk of ransomware attacks and the best strategies for preparing for and responding to an attack.
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  The Technology Supply Chain
Counsel John Dermody details how technological advancements, including 5G and connected devices, carry national security risks and how the federal government is attempting to counter those risks.
Watch now >>

  California Consumer Privacy Act
Special Counsel Scott Pink takes us through the newly effective California Consumer Privacy Act, provides tips for compliance, and discusses anticipated developments.
Watch Now >>




This memorandum is a summary for general information and discussion only and may be considered an advertisement for certain purposes. It is not a full analysis of the matters presented, may not be relied upon as legal advice, and does not purport to represent the views of our clients or the Firm. Steve Bunnell, an O’Melveny partner licensed to practice law in the District of Columbia, Lisa Monaco, an O’Melveny partner licensed to practice law in New York, Michael Dreeben, an O’Melveny partner licensed to practice law in the District of Columbia, Randall Edwards, an O’Melveny partner licensed to practice law in California, Laurel Loomis Rimon, an O’Melveny partner licensed to practice law in California and the District of Columbia, Scott W. Pink, an O’Melveny special counsel licensed to practice law in California and Illinois, John Dermody, an O’Melveny counsel licensed to practice law in California, and Evan N. Schlom, an O’Melveny associate licensed to practice law in the District of Columbia and California, contributed to the content of this newsletter. The views expressed in this newsletter are the views of the authors except as otherwise noted.

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